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Thread: Joe Ruscito's Kitfox S7 Build

  1. #131
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    Default Re: Joe Ruscito's Kitfox S7 Build

    I had the same situation with my tanks, Joe. Relieve (sand) the corner flanges as required to get the tank to sit flush with the cap strips. There's plenty of meat in that area. One of my tanks fit pretty flush but the other was high on 2 corners.

  2. #132
    Senior Member Esser's Avatar
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    Default Re: Joe Ruscito's Kitfox S7 Build

    For sloshing I used other tape.

    You can file that flange on the tank down to get it to sit flush. Obviously be careful and donít leave any stress risers. Once your tanks are in and you still have a bit of unevenness, you can fair it with hysol.
    ------------------
    Josh Esser
    Flying SS7
    Rotax 914iS
    AirMaster Prop

    Edmonton, AB, CWL3

  3. #133
    Senior Member aviator79's Avatar
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    Default Re: Joe Ruscito's Kitfox S7 Build

    Brandon always makes a point of telling people to pressure test after any filing or shaping of the tanks.
    --Brian
    Flying - S7SS

  4. #134
    Senior Member JoeRuscito's Avatar
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    Default Re: Joe Ruscito's Kitfox S7 Build

    Yea thats why I want to get this all done first!

  5. #135
    Senior Member JoeRuscito's Avatar
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    Default Re: Joe Ruscito's Kitfox S7 Build

    Still working on getting my tanks to sit flush and installing my jury struts. Im waiting on a good day to get it outside and unfold the wings. In the meantime Ive been thinking about paint and epoxy primer for the spars and other metal parts. I don't think my kit came with any primer, so how much do I need to do the spars, stringers, and assorted uncovered metal?

    Also in the realm of painting/spraying I know NOTHING! Any and all advice is welcomed. Id like to start getting my setup ready so I can do things like paint the cockpit black before I cover and paint any unprotected metal as I go.

    Thanks as always!

  6. #136
    Senior Member aviator79's Avatar
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    Default Re: Joe Ruscito's Kitfox S7 Build

    If I recall correctly, I ordered a quart of primer which wasn't enough. Then I ordered an additional gallon, and have probably only used about a quarter or a third of it. I would think a gallon should get you through the project pretty easily.

    There are strong opinions about painting equipment. I did all of mine with a Harbor Frieght "professional" $60 HVLP spray gun. I know others have used their $15 spray gun with surprisingly good results. This is actually the gun that they used when I took Gary Hillman's EAA covering workshop. I also had a Harbor Frieght compressor that went Tango Uniform half way through spraying a color coat. So I spent a little more money on a 15 gallon 200 psi 5.4 CFM oil-free compressor, and it's worked well for the rest of the project. I think some will tell you this is totally inadequate, but for this project, I can tell you it worked for me. My paint has some flaws, but they definitely have nothing to do with my equipment. If you can take a covering class, you'll at least get to try your hand at spraying and see good/bad examples.

    Also - take PPE seriously. All these chemicals, and especially catalyzed polyurethane paints can do some real damage to you. I used a quality, full face cartridge respirator with P100 particulate/organic vapor combo cartridges. You will read in the Poly Fiber manual, and hear from internet experts that an Air Purifying Respirator (APR) is totally insufficient and that you must use a supplied-air respirator. If you look into it, this isn't actually true. I won't go into a lengthy discussion of why I chose an APR instead of supplied air, but this might be worth a read. I work in a very safety conscious, hyper-regulated environment and I take my own health and safety very seriously. There's nothing wrong with using supplied air, but it's also not necessary if you use an APR correctly and change your cartridges very conservatively.
    Last edited by aviator79; 01-25-2019 at 07:58 AM.
    --Brian
    Flying - S7SS

  7. #137
    Senior Member jiott's Avatar
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    Default Re: Joe Ruscito's Kitfox S7 Build

    I used 1 qt. of epoxy primer but needed just a little more. I brushed it on rather than spray, so it takes less that way. I primed the spars inside and out, and all bare metal.
    Jim Ott
    Portland, OR
    Kitfox SS7 flying
    Rotax 912ULS

  8. #138

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    Default Re: Joe Ruscito's Kitfox S7 Build

    Quote Originally Posted by aviator79 View Post
    If I recall correctly, I ordered a quart of primer which wasn't enough...
    Having painted cars for 15 years I'd say that a full-face SA system is mandatory. Charcoal filters do nothing for poly-isocyanate fumes. You are also taking it in thru your skin and the worst entry point is your eyes. If you do use a charcoal respirator but leave it out, it continues to "purify" the air so make sure to keep it in an airtight container. Washing your hands or arms off with any kind of thinners or reducers is also very bad.

    You might get away with it for a long time but once your isocyanate "cup is full" your done, you won't be able to come near any of these products again. I've seen it in person and it's not pretty. One guy I worked with that developed a sensitivity to isocyanates had to quit the business. Had been a bodyman/painter for 25+ years. We met him for lunch one day several months after, and he had an asthmatic type attack in the restaurant just from the smell on my clothes, and I always wore a full paint suit!
    James T
    Valrico, FL

  9. #139
    Senior Member aviator79's Avatar
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    Default Re: Joe Ruscito's Kitfox S7 Build

    I agree that you need PPE beyond respiratory protection. Full coveralls with hood, and gloves. Don't come into contact with the paint, especially when it's a mist.

    However, it's not accurate that charcoal filters are ineffective against polyisocyanates. Read the article I linked to above. OSHA and NIOSH both consider Air Purifying Respirators effective against Polyisocyantes if a cartridge change schedule is used. The article even points out that charcoal cartridges actually remain effective against isocyanates for a relatively long time. OSHA's previous "supplied air only" policy was not based on the effectiveness of filters, but on the supposedly poor warning properties, i.e. by the time you smell them, you're above the exposure limit.

    Again, if supplied air makes you feel comfortable, go for it. Just know that there is a lot of incorrect or outdated information about APRs and isocyanates. Choosing an APR is not taking a gamble with your life and health, if you use it correctly. Any respirator must fit correctly, be stored correctly, and be used correctly. You must perform at least a negative pressure check every time you put it on.
    --Brian
    Flying - S7SS

  10. #140

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    Default Re: Joe Ruscito's Kitfox S7 Build

    The main problem being that most people don't fit the mask (simply don't know how to) properly, don't take proper care of it and don't adhere to a proper filter changing schedule. Hanging the respirator on a nail in the shop until the next time you paint is not going to cut it. If you bought the mask three months ago (even less actually) and it's been out in the air (even just sitting) the charcoal cartridges are done. If you have any facial hair you have leaks unless using a full-face FA mask. I just don't think it's worth it. Maybe OSHA did relax the regs and maybe they got a couple million dollar donation from 3M?

    After Bone's the coworker got sick the owner of the shop brought in a chemical poisoning Dr. to go over our safety processes. The crap I learned & saw over those two days scared the shizit out of me, and I've worn a FA respirator since day one! Hell I even wore a charcoal respirator when mixing paint and the mixing room had an exhaust fan.

    I can say this nobody made fun of my "full suit, head sock, gloves and FA system" any more after that.

    And your "Any respirator must fit correctly, be stored correctly, and be used correctly.
    You must perform at least a negative pressure check every time you put it on." is spot on.

    I also agree that folks should just use something and make sure it's working correctly, you only get one set of lungs.
    Last edited by DesertFox4; 01-28-2019 at 03:25 PM.
    James T
    Valrico, FL

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